Marion Junior-Senior High School

 

Library Handbook

 

 

 

Table of Contents

 

Mission Statement

General Information-Policies and Procedures

Library Resources

Plagiarism

Works Cited Guide

Works Cited Example

Evaluating Web Sites

Information Literacy Skills Curriculum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marion Central School

Library Media Center

Mission Statement

 

Mission Statement

 

The mission of the library media program at Marion Central School is to teach students, staff, and members of the school community to effectively locate and apply information. All learners will have the opportunity to become independent, effective, responsible, and creative users of information.Marion�s information skills curriculum allows students of all ages to develop the necessary skills to succeed in the twenty-first century.

 

Role of the Library Media Specialist

 

The school library media specialist assumes many roles and responsibilities. As information specialist and curriculum partner, the library media specialist encourages global access to information, use of technology as an effective teaching and learning tool, and the continuation of reading for information and enjoyment. The school library media specialist must continue to seek a variety of teaching and learning strategies to be able to empower all learners.

 

Collaboration Statement

 

The information literacy curriculum requires collaboration between the library media center staff and classroom teachers. Collaboration facilitates the creation of a professional community whose members work supportively and share the craft of teaching.

 

 

 

 

 

General Information

 

Purpose

The library/media center is the informational hub for the school community. It serves students and teachers by developing the skills of information retrieval and application for problem solving, critical thinking, literacy improvement and pleasure. The library/media center is used for studying, research, reading, and group project planning and presentation. Students will develop their skills in locating and evaluating information from a variety of resources.

 

Student Responsibilities

1.     Students must be working quietly and productively; conducting research, reading, using the computers, etc.

2.     Students must be respectful of equipment, materials, peers, and library personnel.

3.     Language and manners must be appropriate at all times.

4.     Students are expected to follow school wide policies regarding computer usage.

5.     Food and drinks are not allowed in the library.

 

Library Procedures

Students who wish to use the library/media center need to follow the procedures listed below:

1.     Sign up on the library pass from study hall and quickly proceed to the library. The students need to sign in when they get to the library.

2.     Stay in the library for the entire period, unless otherwise noted on the students pass. Students who are assigned to an 80 minute study hall may only sign out for half of that period.

3.     Use a pass card to leave the library during the period. Students must return to the library within a reasonable amount of time.

4.     Pre-signed passes must be from one of the students classroom teachers. Students should only get a pre-signed if they need to use library resources.

Students who choose not to follow these procedures will lose their library privileges.

 

Circulation

1.     Materials are checked out for two weeks and can be renewed if necessary.

2.     Students may check out 5 books at a time.

3.     Students who have overdue materials will not be able to check out additional resources until the overdue items are returned.

4.     Payment for lost or damaged materials is the responsibility of the borrower.

5.     The library staff must check out materials.

6.     Materials can be borrowed through inter library loan with the assistance of the librarians.

7.     Magazines are not allowed out of the library.

8.     Overdue notices will be sent to borrowers who owe materials. Bills for materials that are overdue will be sent home at the end of the first semester and at the end of the school year. Borrowers are financially responsible for the cost of replacing lost items.

 

Class use of the library

The library/media center may be reserved for class use. Teachers are requested to:

       Reserve the library at least one day ahead of the date(s) that the library will be needed.

       Stay with their class while they are in the library.

       Call the library before sending an individual student or a group of students from your class to the library. It is critical that the library staff knows how many students to expect.

 

 

 

Library/Media Center Procedures and Responsibilities

 

Purpose

The library/media center is the informational hub for the school community. It serves students and teachers by developing the skills of informational retrieval and application for problem solving, critical thinking, literacy improvement and pleasure. The library/media center is used for studying, research, reading, and group project planning and presentation. Students will develop their skills in locating and evaluating information from a variety of resources.

 

Student Responsibilities

6.     Students must be working quietly and productively; conducting research, reading, using the computers, etc.

7.     Students must be respectful of equipment, materials, peers, and library personnel.

8.     Language and manners must be appropriate at all times.

9.     Students are expected to follow school wide policies regarding computer usage.

 

 

 

Academic Eligibility:

 

Students who are on the academic ineligibility or removed lists have restricted library privileges. These students may come to the library only if they need to use reference materials or computers for school-related purposes. Students must follow the procedures listed below:

 

       Students must ask the library/media center staff for a pre-signed pass to come to the library or computer room.

*Note: Students may only get a pass for periods that they have study labs. Students are not allowed to get passes to leave class!

 

       Pre-signed passes to the library will only be given prior to the first bell each morning.

 

       Students are expected to work while they are in the library. Upon completion of the assignment, the student must report back to study lab.

 

       Students who fail to work while in the library will lose their library privileges.

 

 

 

 

Library/Media Center Resources

 

-         Over 35 magazine subscriptions

-         5 newspaper subscriptions

-         Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC)

-         InfotracOnline magazine and newspaper database

-         Grolier's Online Encyclopedia

-         Web Path Express--program linking research topics to appropriate web sites

-         UXL Biographies

-         National Geographic on CD Rom

-         Science News on CDRom

-         Recorded books on tape and CD

-         10,000 printed titles

-         Access to InterLibrary Loan

-         Scanner, copier and color printer

 

 

 

 

Plagiarism

 

What is plagiarism?

Plagiarism is using others ideas or words without clearly acknowledging the source of your information (Plagiarism-Indiana U.1).

 

What are some examples of plagiarism?

-         copying word for word without quotes or acknowledging the author or source of information

-         paraphrasing without giving an author or source

-         using an authors idea with crediting the author or source

-         using an authors idea without crediting the author or source

-         changing just as few words or changing the order of sentences of the original work without crediting the source or author (Plagiarism-Indiana U.4-5)

 

When do you need to document to avoid plagiarism?

Give credit whenever you use the following:

-         another persons ideas, opinion or theory

-         facts, statistics, graphs and/or drawings that are not common knowledge

-         quotations of another persons actual spoken or written word

-         paraphrases of another persons actual spoken or written word

-         information gained from an interview, conversation, or email

-         references to somebody elses words or ideas from a magazine, newspaper, song, TV program, movie, Web page, computer program or advertisement (Avoiding Plagiarism-Purdue University 3-4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How do you give credit for your sources of information in the body of your work?

Use parenthetical references after the words or ideas you take from someone else. Choose from one of the following formats:

 

One author: Citing a complete work

With author in textIn Women and Art, Elsa Honig Fine implies

That there were strong male artist figures in the lives of many female

artists.

 

Without author in textWomen and Art implies that a strong male

Artist figure is a major factor in the lives of women artists. (Fine)

 

One author: Citing part of a work

List the page numbers in parentheses if you borrow ideas or words

From a particular work.

 

With author in textElas Fine states that Mary Cassatt worked

hard to combine her career as an artist with her life as a proper

Victorian lady (129).

 

Without author in textHay fever, also known as allergic rhinitis,

is an allergic reaction to materials in the air. (Brynie 96).

 

Works Cited

 

Avoiding Plagiarism. Online Writing Lab. Online. Internet.30 April

2003. Available: <http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/

research/r_plagiar.html>

Plagiarism: What It Is and How to Recognize and Avoid It.

Plagiarism. Online. Internet. 30 April 2003. Available:

http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/wts/plagiarism.html

Sebranek, Patrick, Meyer, Verne, and Kemper, Dave. Write for

College.

Wilmington, MA: Great Source Education Group,Inc. 1997.

 

 

WORKS CITED GUIDE

 

 

BOOKS WITH ONE AUTHOR:

 

Author's Last Name, First Name. Title of Book. City of

 

Publication: Name of Publisher, Date.

 

EXAMPLE:

 

Freeman, Richard. Spiders and Other Creepy Creatures. Philadelphia:

 

J.B. Lippincott Company, 1999.

_____________________________________________________________

 

BOOKS WITH TWO OR THREE AUTHORS:

 

Authors Last Name, First Name, and First Name Last Name

 

of second author. Title of Book. City of publication:

 

Name of publisher, Date.

 

EXAMPLE:

 

Forrester, Raymond and Jenny Moran. Liver Transplants.

 

New York: Holiday House, Inc. 1997.

 

_____________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

BOOKS WITH MORE THAN THREE AUTHORS:

 

First Authors Last Name, First Name, et al. Title of Book.

 

City of Publication: Name of Publisher, Date.

 

EXAMPLE:

 

Thorton, Peter, et al. The Secret of Life. New York:

 

Harper & Row, 2002.

 

 

 

BOOK WITH NO AUTHOR:

 

Title of Book. City of Publication: Name of Publisher, Date.

 

EXAMPLE:

 

World Almanac and Book of Facts 2003. Mahwah, New Jersey:

 

World Almanac, 2003.

 

 

ENCYCLOPEDIA: (General)

 

Author of article Last Name, First Name. (if an author is listed)

 

"Title of Article." Name of Encyclopedia. Date.

 

EXAMPLE:

 

Deitrich, Walter. "Nuclear Energy." World Book Encyclopedia. 2001.

 

 

 

MULTIVOLUME WORK:

 

Editor of work Last Name First Name, ed. Title of Work.

 

Volume number. City of Publication: Name of Publisher,

 

Date. Number of Volumes.

 

EXAMPLE:

 

Magill, Frank N., ed. Magills Survey of American Literature. Vol. 2.

 

New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp., 1991. 6 vols.

 

 

INTERVIEW:

 

Last Name of person interviewed, First Name. Kind of Interview. Date.

 

EXAMPLE:

 

Prezioso, Nicholas. Personal interview. 24 June 2003.

 

 

VIDEO OR FILM:

 

Title. Dir. Directors First name Last name. Distributor, Date.

 

EXAMPLE:

 

Legends of the Wild, Wild, West. Dir. Fred Capra. Mirimax, 2003.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MUSIC:

 

Last Name, First Name of artist. Title of Recording. Recording Company,

 

year.

 

EXAMPLE:

 

Carlton, Vanessa. Be Not Nobody. Universal, 2002.

 

 

PAMPLET:

 

Authors First Name, Last Name. Title of Pamphlet. City of Publication:

Name of Publisher, Year.

 

EXAMPLE:

 

Burkett, Michael. Junk: A Look At Heroin Treatment and Alternatives.

 

Phoenix: D.I.N. Publications, 1982.

 

 

MAGAZINE:

 

Last Name of Author, First Name of Author. Title of Article. Name of

 

The Magazine. Day Month Year: page numbers.

 

EXAMPLE:

 

Wallace, Andrew. The Mystery of SARS. Newsweek. 5 May 2003:

 

26-32.

 

*If the article is not printed on consecutive pages, write only the first page

number and a plus sign. For example: 24+.

 

 

NEWSPAPER:

 

Last Name of Author, First Name. Title of Article. Name of Newspaper

 

Day Month Year, section letter or number: page number.

 

EXAMPLE:

 

Roth, Leo. Bills Brain Trust Ready For Draft Day. Democrat and

 

Chronicle 25 April 2003, sec. D: 1+.

 

 

 

 

CD-Rom:

 

Last Name of Author, First Name. Title of Article. Name of the CD-

 

Rom. CD-ROM. City of Publication: Name of the Publisher, Year.

 

EXAMPLE:

 

Baker, Ian. "Tibet Embraces the New Year." National Geographic.

CD-ROM. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic Society,

 

Jan. 2000.

 

 


 

PLAY:

 

Author's Last Name, First Name. Title of Play. City of Publication: Name

 

of Publisher, Date.

 

EXAMPLE:

 

Williams, George. American Presidents. New York: Doubleday, 1998.

 

_____________________________________________________________

 

 

INTERNET:

 

Last Name of Author, First Name. "Title of the Article." Site Name. The

 

Medium (Online). The Computer Network. Day Month Year.

 

Available: electronic address.

 

EXAMPLE:

 

Abbott, Christopher. "Civil Rights." Education Today. Online. U of

 

Maine Lib. Internet. 29 Dec. 2003. Available: <education~maine.edu.>

 

 

 

*** If some of the information is unavailable, cite as much as possible. Use the same format as above, skipping any information that is unavailable.

 

 

 

Works Cited

List of works cited Booth, William. "Monkeying With Language: Is Chimp Using

begins on a separate

page. Words or Merely Aping Handlers?" Washington Post

 

29 Oct. 1990: A3.

 

Heading, centered, Davis, Flora. Eloquent Animals: A Study in Animal

is typed 1" from top

of page Communication: New York: Coward, 1978.

 

 

List is Desmond, Adrian. The Ape's Reflection. New York: Wade-

alphabetized

by author's Dial, 1979.

last name

Eckholm, Erik. "Kanzi the Chimp: A Life in Science."

 

First line of an New York Times 25 June 1985, local ed.: C1+.

entry is typed

at left margin: ---. "Pygmy Chimp Readily Learns Language Skill."

Subsequent lines

are indented five New York Times 24 June 1985, local ed.: A1+.

spaces.

Gibbons, Ann. "Deja Vu All Over Again: Chimp-Language

 

Wars." Science 251 (1991): 1561-62.

 

Double-spacing is Greenfield, Paricia Marks, and E. Sue Savage-Rumbaugh.

used throughout.

"Grammatical Combination in Panpaniscus: Processes

of Learning and Invention in the Evolution and

Development of Language." Language and Intelligence

 

in Monkeys. Ed. Sue Taylor Parker. Cambridge

 

UP, 1990. 540-78.

 

 

 

Leakey, Richard, and Roger Lewin. Origins Reconsidered:

 

In Search of What Makes Us Human. New York:

Doubleday, 1992.

Lewis, Roger. "Look Who's Talking Now." New Scientist.

29 Apr. 1991: 49-52.

Marx, Jean L. "Ape-Language Controversy Flares Up."

Science. 207 (1980): 1330-33.

Patterson, Francine, and Eugene Linden. The Education of

Koko. New York: Holt, 1981.

Robbins, Esther. Personal interview. 17 May 1993.

Sebeok, Thomas A., and Jean Umider-Sebeok. "Performing

Animals: Secrets of the Trade." Psychology Today

Nov. 1979: 65-76.

________________________________________________________

 

 

 

Hacker, Diana. A Writer's Reference. St. Martin's: Bedford, 2002.

Evaluating Web Sites

 

Critically evaluating information sources is an important part of the research process. Consider the following criteria to determine the relevance, accuracy, and credibility of internet sources.

 

1.   Who wrote the article?

       What are the authors credentials? Is the author associated with a reputable institution or organization?

 

2.   Date of Publication.

       When was the article written? Is the source current or out-of-date for your topic?

 

3.   Point of View.

       Is the information factual, opinion, or propaganda? Is the information supported by evidence?

       Is the authors point of view objective and impartial? Is the language free of emotion-arousing words and bias?

 

4.   Content Analysis

       What is the intended audience of the site? Is the source appropriate for your needs, or is the site too elementary, too technical, or too advanced to be of use?

       Is the site well-organized and easy to use? Are there working links to related sites?

       Is the source primary or secondary in nature? Incorporate both primary and secondary sources whenever possible in your research.


 

5.    Where was the site created?

       Look at the URL to help determine where the site originated, and to help ascertain the validity of a site.

a.    .gov -- generally applies to federal departments

b.    .gc -- used by the federal government of Canada

c.     .edu -- generally used by colleges and universities

d.    .org -- used by a variety of groups and non-profit organizations

e.     .com -- usually indicates commercial organizations

f.     .net -- intended for organizations directly involved in internet operations, such as internet service providers.

 

 

"Knowing What's What and What's Not: The 5 W's of Cyberspace." Media Awareness

 

Network. Online. 12 May 2003. Available: <www.media-awareness.ca/

 

English/resources/special_initiatives/wa_shared/tipsheets/5Ws_of_cyberspace.

 

cfm>

Ormondroyd, Joan. "Critically Analyzing Information Sources." Reference Services

 

Division. Online. Cornell University Library. Internet. 12 May 2003.

 

Available: <library.cornell.edu/okuref/research/skill26.htm>